HULL: YORKSHIRE'S MARITIME city

As Yorkshire’s maritime city, Hull is now working on an extensive redevelopment of its significant historic maritime assets. Building upon the legacy and success of UK City of Culture 2017, it supports Hull’s aspiration to become a world-class visitor destination.

The sites included within this ambitious project are: Hull Maritime Museum; Dock Office Chambers on New Cross Street, the North End Shipyard on Dock Office Row and two historic vessels, the Arctic Corsair and Spurn Lightship.

The project explores and celebrates Hull’s remarkable maritime history. Our heritage will be at the heart of a place-making programme that will preserve several significant assets and move Hull forward as a world-class visitor destination. A Heritage Lottery Fund grant of £15m in a project of £27.4m will ensure that Hull’s maritime history is well preserved and celebrated by everyone. Hull City Council has also committed £10m towards the project to conserve and promote the maritime heritage assets it owns.

Drawing on Hull’s unique spirit and sense of place, this heritage-driven, transformational project will focus on the promotion and protection of Hull’s maritime history, architecture and its priceless collections.

Over the next five-years work will be undertaken that will place our maritime heritage at the heart of our city offer.

 

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The Arctic Corsair

The Arctic Corsair is the sole survivor of Hull’s distant-water sidewinder trawler fleet and a key part of the nation’s maritime heritage. Work involving this iconic vessel will include:

  • Full restoration
  • A permanent dry-berth to ensure long term preservation
  • Ongoing marketing and promotion to raise awareness of her national significance
  • New and improved interpretation facilitating increased tourism and educational visits
  • A range of skills and training opportunities
  • Increased opening hours
  • Enhanced volunteering programmes leading to a projected 230 per cent increase in volunteering

HULL MARITIME MUSEUM

Arguably one of the most striking buildings in the city, investment in the former offices of the Hull Dock Company will ensure it is used to its full capacity by:

  • Creating 390 m2 of additional museum space opened up to the public
  • Allowing access to one of the building’s cupolas with superb rooftop views
  • Investment in renewing the building’s infrastructure to reveal original architecture
  • Improved and extended educational and visitor facilities along with updated displays that bring Hull’s whole maritime story up to date

Have your say!

Hull City Council is asking for public feedback on plans to transform some of Hull’s most important maritime treasures and places.

The ambitious plans will see the regeneration of the Arctic Corsair, North End Shipyard, Spurn Lightship, Dock Office Chambers and the magnificent Hull Maritime Museum to create an exciting new maritime route that will guide visitors through the heart of the city from Queen Victoria Square to the River Hull.

Jointly funded by the council and the National Lottery Heritage Fund – subject to a successful funding bid – the project will mark the start of a new chapter in the city’s journey as a culturally vibrant maritime city.

The ‘story so far’ exhibition will transport visitors to 2022 when the plans will have become a reality. Never-seen-before artists’ and architects’ drawings and computer generated visuals will show how Hull’s outstanding maritime heritage will be protected, preserved and celebrated for generations to come.

If Hull succeeds in securing £13.6m of National Lottery Heritage Fund funding, work to create the major new attraction will begin later this year, delivering a major boost to the plans to build a lasting and sustainable legacy from Hull’s year as UK City of Culture.

Trinity Market will be the first of seven locations across the city to host the travelling roadshow, offering the public the opportunity to see how the restored Arctic Corsair will look in a permanent home to become a new, must-see visitor attraction in a former dock at the North End Shipyard, as well as exciting, transformational plans for the Hull Maritime Museum, making a museum for the future.

From Thursday 25 April, the ‘story so far’ exhibition will go on public display and the maritime project team will be seeking further comments and feedback to develop the exciting plans further.

The plans are also available in the news section at maritimeHull.co.uk

Hull City Council has committed £10m to the project and in May 2019, a round-two bid for a £13.6m grant will be submitted to the National Lottery Heritage Fund after successfully securing a £1.34m round-one development grant in June 2017. If successful, work could start in early 2020.

This project alone will bring an additional £2.86m a year into the local economy and attract over 300,000 visitors into the city. Added to the greater offer this project continues the regeneration of the city through its culture and heritage.

The public will have the opportunity to view, comment and speak to council staff on the proposals at Hull Trinity Market until Thursday 2 May and will be on site at the exhibition from 10am – 3pm daily.

They will then visit the various locations across the city between 10am – 3pm:

  • Friday 3 May until Thursday 9 May at Freedom Centre, Preston Road, Hull HU93QB
  • Friday 10 May until Thursday 16 May at Edinburgh Street Community Centre, 140 Woodcock Street, Hull HU33SP
  • Friday 17 May until Thursday 23 May at Unity in Community, 501 Endike Lane, Hull HU68AQ
  • Friday 24 May until Thursday 30 May at North Bransholme Community Centre (Phoenix Project), Lothian Way, Hull HU75DD
  • Monday 20 May until Thursday 30 May at Princes Quay Shopping Centre, Hull city centre, Hull HU12PQ
  • Friday 31 May until Wednesday 31 July at Hull Maritime Museum, Queen Victoria Square, Hull HU13DX

We are calling on you to support the ambitious bid and you can get involved by:

  • Get in the maritime frame and share on social media – they will be all over the city and at major events
  • Tell us your maritime stories by emailing hymc@hullcc.gov.uk
  • Like and follow us on Facebook at Hull: Yorkshire’s Maritime City
  • Follow us on Twitter @Hullmaritime
  • Follow us on Instagram @Hullmaritime

You can also follow Hull: Yorkshire’s Maritime City on Twitter @Hullmaritime #HullYMC and on Facebook at Hull: Yorkshire’s Maritime City, Instagram @Hullmaritime and YouTube.

To coincide with the launch of the plans and to gain support for the round-two bid an emotive film, ‘Born on the Tide’, has been released. It explores Hull’s maritime history as seen through the eyes of different generations, highlighting the community’s deeply held connection to the sea and the world. The short film can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3EaGekDRCc&feature=youtu.be

For more information on the project and the wider impacts visit maritimeHull.co.uk

Hull’s major maritime project

Hull City Council has been successful in a National Lottery Heritage Fund (NLHF) Round One bid to secure £15m as part of a £27.4m major investment programme, to celebrate and secure Hull’s extensive maritime assets and collections. The initial NLHF grant of £1.37m will develop the project further for a round two submission, due in May 2019, approval of which will release the full grant.

Building on its success as UK City of Culture 2017, this historic maritime city will reclaim, protect and share every element of its maritime past, present and future by developing three important sites: the Maritime Museum; the Dock Office Chambers and the North End Shipyard; and the conservation of two historic vessels, the Arctic Corsair and Spurn Lightship.

Over the next four years a programme of work and activities will be undertaken that will place our maritime heritage at the heart of our city offer forming part of the journey to make Hull as a world-class visitor destination.

National Lottery Heritage Fund 

Thanks to National Lottery players, we invest money to help people across the UK explore, enjoy and protect the heritage they care about – from the archaeology under our feet to the historic parks and buildings we love, from precious memories and collections to rare wildlife. www.heritagefund.org.uk/ 

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THE COLLECTIONS

The museum’s collections are ‘Designated’ as being of national significance and the British and European whaling collections are the most significant in the world. In addition, the extensive collection of scrimshaw is regarded as the best outside of the United States. However, better storage and display will allow these collections to truly shine for a bigger audience. As part of the project:

  • There will be a 50 per cent increase in the number of items available for public view
  • 37,852 collections items will be re-housed
  • Collections will undergo extensive conservation and will be stored in a bespoke, regulated environment
  • The collections will be assessed, conserved and properly stored, with new management and maintenance routines

Dock Office Chambers

This building dates from 1890s and is in a conservation area, adjacent to the Maritime Museum. Currently used as office space it will be reconfigured to house the maritime collections and will:

  • House bespoke storage systems which are environmentally controlled
  • Be fully accessible for visitors, volunteers and researchers
  • Enable the top floor of the museum to be redesigned and reopened to the public

THE SPURN LIGHTSHIP

Listed on the National Historic Ships Register and a part of the National Historic Fleet, the Spurn Lightship guided vessels navigating the notorious Humber estuary. Project work will include:

  • Full restoration
  • New interpretation
  • Increased opening hours
  • Refreshed displays

Following restoration the ship will remain in the Marina and continue to act as a signpost for the city centre, Hull Marina, and the other museums in Hull

NORTH END SHIPYARD - DOCK OFFICE ROW

This area is at the heart of Hull’s maritime and trade history with ship building taking place and ships berthing to discharge cargo into High Street , the centre of trade at the time. The central dry dock became the lock-pit of Queen’s Dock in 1774 when the Act of Parliament was granted for the Dock Company to form a new dock.

In 1775 – The Blaydes family sold their shipyard (which built both the HMS Bounty and HMS Boreas, commanded by Nelson) outside the North Gates to the Dock Company for the formation of a new Dock.

The project will seek to preserve this heritage and raise the profile of how this area acted as a catalyst for Hull’s history as a global maritime port by:

  • Revealing a hidden gem of Hull’s maritime heritage and celebrating the historic significance of High Street.
  • Creating an additional attraction near the Museums Quarter
  • Housing the Arctic Corsair in a permanent dry berth
  • Restoring the 20th century Scotch Derrick Crane on site, as a key symbol of recent maritime past
  • Highlighting the significance of the Queens Gardens (formerly Queen’s Dock) in the maritime story of Hull’s old town

The project will seek to preserve this heritage and raise the profile of how this area acted as a catalyst for Hull’s history as a global maritime port by:

  • Revealing a hidden gem of Hull’s maritime heritage and celebrating the historic significance of High Street.
  • Creating an additional attraction near the Museums Quarter
  • Housing the Arctic Corsair in a permanent dry berth
  • Restoring the Scotch Derrick Crane on site, as a key symbol of recent maritime past
  • Highlighting the significance of the Queens Gardens (formerly Queen’s Dock) in the maritime story of Hull’s old town